File Descriptions

LASSO-CACTI consists of a suite of data organized around each simulation. This section describes how the available files are organized and the contents of the different file types. The method for downloading the files is explained in the Bundle Browser section of the documentation.

The categories of available files are model inputs, model restart data, raw model output, output subsets, and evaluation data. Each of these comprises an independent data set in ARM parlance, but collectively they are all part of LASSO-CACTI. Users can download whichever pieces of LASSO-CACTI they require without having to acquire the other file types.

WRF Input Files

The WRF input files contain all the information required to initialize and run the respective simulation. The file downloaded to the user consists of a tar file containing the WRF run directory. In addition to using the contents of the tar files to rerun LASSO-CACTI simulations, the information in these files is useful for identifying model configuration choices, e.g., in the WRF namelist.input file.

The tar files also include the Metgrid output, i.e., the met_em files, for domains D1 and D2 if users are interested in rerunning WRF’s real.exe program for a different physics configuration for the given case date and ensemble member input data set. The met_em files are also useful for displaying how the input data sets represent the meteorological conditions, which can aid in understanding why the WRF output differs between ensemble members as well as in identifying biases in WRF behavior versus characteristics imposed on WRF by the initial conditions and boundary forcing.

Because the four WRF domains are run in two pairings of domains, there are two different types of input tar files, one for the mesoscale and one for the LES domains. The inputs included in the mesoscale tar files derive from the global input data sets, while the inputs in the LES tar files derive from the mesoscale parent domain, D3, of that ensemble member.

A listing of the files in an example mesoscale input tar file is at input_tarfile_list_meso.txt. The complementary listing for an LES input tar file is at input_tarfile_list_les.txt. The typical size of the input tar files is 1.5 GB and 17 GB for the mesoscale and LES simulations, respectively.

Note that the input files are named as required to run WRF. Because of this, files associated with domains D3 and D4 are labeled as d01 and d02 in the filenames within the LES tar file. This is a nuance of the WRF workflow when using ndown.exe. Thus, there will be multiple files with identical names but different content for the combined mesoscale and LES input file suite, e.g., wrfinput_d01, with one for D1 and another for D3.

WRF Restart Files

Restart files for re-running the LES simulations from an arbitrary point during the simulation are available every 30 minutes. Restart files were not output for the mesoscale simulations since they run sufficiently fast that users can rerun the entire mesoscale simulation in less than a day.

Performing a restart simulation requires two different downloads. The first is the input files that contain the run directory and boundary forcings, described above. The second is the restart file for the D3 and, optionally, D4 domain(s) for the desired restart time. It is possible to run D3 without D4, but not the other way around—rerunning D4 will require running D3 at the same time since they are nested together online.

Note that the filenames of the restart files will need to be changed from what is used when archiving the files versus what WRF expects for using them. Specifically, the archived filename will be similar to corlasso.wrfrst.2019012900gefs05d4.base.M1.m0.20190129.173000.nc, where the case date is encoded toward the left-hand side of the filename, 29-Jan-2019 00 UTC in this example, and the restart time is encoded toward the right-hand side of the filename, 29-Jan-2019 17:30 UTC. The equivalent WRF filename for this file is wrfrst_d02_2019-01-29_17_30_00. Note that the domain number, D4, is mapped to d02 for the online nesting (D3 would become d01), and the convention used for LASSO is to have underscores instead of colons in the filenames (no_colons=.true. in namelist.input). Full details regarding the file naming convention used for LASSO-CACTI files are in the File Naming Convention section.

With the restart files properly named and placed in the run directory provided with the input suite of files, the user should be able to proceed with the restart following the typical WRF workflow for doing restarts. The restart time will need to be updated in namelist.input, any other desired changes can be made to the code or configuration parameters, such as changing the output frequency, and a properly compiled wrf.exe executable will be required.

Note that many of the input tar files contain pre-compiled wrf.exe executable files that were originally used to run the simulations. However, some simulations were done on an earlier ARM computer that no longer exists. So, the executables may or may not work on the current ARM Cumulus cluster. Users can obtain copies of the WRF source code used for LASSO-CACTI from https://code.arm.gov/lasso/lasso-cacti/lasso-wrf-cacti, which can then be compiled for the machine where the restart will take place.

Raw WRF Output Files

Users needing the full detail provided in the WRF output can download the raw WRF output files for each domain. These files contain all the model levels on the native grid along with every variable in one file as output in WRF’s wrfout file format. Each wrfout file is archived independently, i.e., each time for each simulation has one file. These files use unique filenames identifying them with their associated simulations and times. See the File Naming Convention section of the documentation for details on the naming; an example is corlasso.wrfout.2019012900gefs05d4.base.M1.m0.20190129.173000.nc.

The file sizes are substantial for the innermost domains. Typical file sizes for the four domains are 623 MB, 2.8 GB, 19 GB, and 171 GB, respectively. As can be seen, working with the files for D3 and D4 can become challenging without resorting to specialized hardware and techniques, such as using Python’s Dask library to chunk the data in memory and/or parallelize tasks across multiple compute nodes. Therefore, it is recommended that users work with the subset files, described next, when possible.

The contents of the wrfout files can be seen in this example netCDF header: wrfout_hdr_D4.txt. Some variables, such as pressure and height, are stored as a pair of base and perturbation values. Other variables are located on staggered grids following an Arakawa C-grid approach. Details on the specifics of variable definitions, the grid used for the variables, and the naming of the variables can be found in the WRF User’s Guide [Wang et al., 2019].

Model output is provided every 15 minutes for domains D1, D2, and D3. The highest resolution-domain, D4, has output every five minutes.

Subsetted WRF Output

The raw WRF output has been post-processed into variable subsets, where related variables are grouped into separate files. This will meet the needs of a large percentage of users so they will not need to download the full wrfout files. For example, the primary meteorological state variables like temperature, pressure, and winds destaggered to the center point of the grid cells are all in the “met” subset category.

Most variables in the subset files are directly copied from the wrfout files. However, additional diagnostic variables are calculated to simplify data processing for users. Examples include:

  • Variables that are originally on staggered grids, primarily the winds, are interpolated to the grid cell centers;

  • Normal temperature is calculated from the output potential temperature perturbation;

  • Convective available potential energy (CAPE) and related diagnostics like convective inhibition are calculated.

Another helpful post-processing step is interpolation to alternative vertical grids. Subset groupings are provided on the raw model levels, pressure levels, height above ground, and height above sea level. The specific levels are listed in Table 19.

Table 20 lists the different subset groupings. Additionally, the specific variables included in each subset are provided via links from within the table. The frequency of the available output mimics the output frequency from the WRF simulations. So, domains D1, D2, and D3 have subsets every 15 minutes, and D4 has subsets every five minutes.

Users interested in generating their own subset files can start with the subsetwrf software provided with LASSO-CACTI and expand it to suit their needs. For example, some users have wanted more vertical levels than those provided in the height interpolations. Others have wanted the variables grouped differently to assist in their research. More detail about subsetwrf is provided in the software section of the documentation. The subsetting can be done on ARM’s Cumulus2 cluster to avoid having to first download the wrfout files to an outside institution.

Table 19 Levels available for the different subset files, both raw model levels and interpolated to alternate heights.
Level Configuration
(units; count)
Provided Levels

Raw model levels on mass grid (eta; 149)

0.9985125, 0.9954678, 0.9922807, 0.9889451, 0.9854548, 0.981803, 0.9779831, 0.9739879, 0.9698104, 0.9654431, 0.9608783, 0.9561083, 0.951125, 0.9459202, 0.9404855, 0.9348122, 0.9288918, 0.9227152, 0.9162734, 0.9095575, 0.9025581, 0.8952659, 0.8876719, 0.8797667, 0.8715411, 0.862986, 0.8540924, 0.8448515, 0.8352549, 0.8252944, 0.8149619, 0.8042502, 0.7931526, 0.7816627, 0.769775, 0.7574849, 0.7447884, 0.7316829, 0.7181668, 0.7042396, 0.6899024, 0.6751577, 0.6600096, 0.644464, 0.6285287, 0.6122136, 0.5955307, 0.5784943, 0.561121, 0.54343, 0.5254432, 0.5071849, 0.4886823, 0.4699655, 0.4514357, 0.4335449, 0.4163461, 0.3998125, 0.3839184, 0.3686391, 0.3539508, 0.3398306, 0.3262565, 0.3132074, 0.300663, 0.2886038, 0.2770111, 0.2658667, 0.2551534, 0.2448544, 0.2349538, 0.225436, 0.2162865, 0.2074908, 0.1990353, 0.1909069, 0.1830928, 0.175581, 0.1683597, 0.1614177, 0.1547443, 0.1483289, 0.1421617, 0.136233, 0.1305336, 0.1250546, 0.1197876, 0.1147242, 0.1098568, 0.1051775, 0.1006793, 0.09635506, 0.09219806, 0.08820182, 0.08436017, 0.0806671, 0.07711688, 0.07370396, 0.07042304, 0.06726904, 0.06423703, 0.06132228, 0.05852027, 0.05582664, 0.05323719, 0.05074789, 0.04835489, 0.04605443, 0.04384294, 0.041717, 0.03967329, 0.03770861, 0.03581993, 0.0340043, 0.0322589, 0.030581, 0.028968, 0.02741739, 0.02592675, 0.02449377, 0.02311621, 0.02179193, 0.02051887, 0.01929506, 0.01811858, 0.0169876, 0.01590037, 0.01485518, 0.01385042, 0.01288453, 0.01195599, 0.01106337, 0.01020527, 0.009380363, 0.00858737, 0.00782504, 0.007092199, 0.006387707, 0.005710453, 0.005059393, 0.004433527, 0.003831864, 0.003253465, 0.00269744, 0.002162924, 0.001649079, 0.001155109, 0.0006802468, 0.000223749

Heights above ground level (m; 33)

50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1800, 1900, 2000, 2250, 2500, 2750, 3000, 3250, 3500, 3750, 4000, 4250, 4500, 4750, 5000

Heigts above mean sea level (m; 40)

250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250, 1500, 1750, 2000, 2250, 2500, 2750, 3000, 3250, 3500, 3750, 4000, 4250, 4500, 4750, 5000, 5250, 5500, 6000, 6500, 7000, 7500, 8000, 9000, 10000, 11000, 12000, 13000, 14000, 15000, 16000, 17000, 18000, 19000, 20000, 21000

Pressure levels (hPa; 11)

925, 850, 700, 500, 400, 300, 250, 200, 150, 100, 70

Table 20 List of subset files and the variables they contain.

Subset Grouping

File Type Abbreviation

Variables

aerosol

aer

QNWFA2D: surface emissions of water friendly aerosol
QNIFA2D: surface emissions of ice friendly aerosol
QNWFA: water friendly aerosol number concentration
QNIFA: ice friendly aerosol number concentration

cloud

cld

QCLOUD: cloud-water mixing ratio
QRAIN: rainwater mixing ratio
QICE: ice crystal mixing ratio
QSNOW: snow mixing ratio
QGRAUP: graupel mixing ratio
QNICE: ice number concentration
QNRAIN: raindrop number concentration
QNCLOUD: cloud droplet number concentration
REFL_10CM: radar reflectivity, λ=10 cm
CLDFRA: radiative cloud fraction
LWP: liquid water path
IWP: ice water path
PRECIPWATER: precipitable water

cloud on Hagl

cldhagl

Same variables as cld but levels interpolated to heights above ground level.

cloud on Hamsl

cldhamsl

Same variables as cld but levels interpolated to heights above mean sea level.

cloud on pressure

cldpres

Same variables as cld but levels interpolated to pressure levels.

meteorology

met

HGT: terrain height
HAMSL: level height above mean sea level
MUTOT: dry air mass in column
P_HYD: hydrostatic pressure
PRESSURE: pressure
ALT: inverse density
TEMPERATURE: temperature
THETA: potential temperature
THETA_E: equivalent potential temperature
QVAPOR: water vapor mixing ratio
RH: relative humidity with respect to water
UA: destaggred U-wind component
VA: destaggered V-wind component
WA: destaggered vertical velocity
UMET: earth-relative westerly wind component
VMET: earth-relative southerly wind component
POTVORT: potential vorticity
PSFC: surface pressure
SLP: sea-level pressure
Q2: 2-m water vapor mixing ratio
T2: 2-m temperature
TH2: 2-m potential temperature
U10: 10-m U-wind component
V10: 10-m V-wind component
UMET10: 10-m earth-relative westerly wind component
VMET10: 10-m earth-relative southerly wind component
SHEAR_MAG_SFC-TO-1KM: magnitude of shear from surface to 1-km AGL
SHEAR_DIR_SFC-TO-1KM: direction of shear from surface to 1-km AGL
SHEAR_MAG_SFC-TO-3KM: magnitude of shear from surface to 3-km AGL
SHEAR_DIR_SFC-TO-3KM: direction of shear from surface to 3-km AGL

(meteorology continued)

SHEAR_MAG_SFC-TO-6KM: magnitude of shear from surface to 6-km AGL
SHEAR_DIR_SFC-TO-6KM: direction of shear from surface to 6-km AGL
SHEAR_MAG_SFC-TO-9KM: magnitude of shear from surface to 9-km AGL
SHEAR_DIR_SFC-TO-9KM: direction of shear from surface to 9-km AGL
RAINC: accumulated convective surface precipitation (D1 only)
RAINNC: accumulated non-convective surface precipitation
SNOWNC: accumulated surface snow
GRAUPELNC: accumulated surface graupel
SR: fraction of frozen precipitation
MLLCL: mixed-layer lifting condensation level
MLLFC: mixed-layer level of free convection
MLLNB: mixed-layer level of neutral buoyancy
MLLPL: mixed-layer lifted parcel level
MLCAPE: mixed-layer convective available potential energy
MLCIN: mixed-layer convective inhibition
MULCL: most-unstable lifting condensation level
MULFC: most-unstable level of free convection
MULNB: most-unstable level of neutral buoyancy
MULPL: most-unstable lifted parcel level
MUCAPE: most-unstable convective available potential energy
MUCIN: most-unstable convective inhibition
REFL_10CM_MAX: column-maximum radar reflectivity, λ=10 cm

meteorology on Hagl

methagl

Variables interpolated to heights above ground level.
HGT: terrain height
MUTOT: dry air mass in column
PRESSURE: pressure
ALT: inverse density
TEMPERATURE: temperature
THETA: potential temperature
THETA_E: equivalent potential temperature
QVAPOR: water vapor mixing ratio
RH: relative humidity with respect to water
UA: destaggred U-wind component
VA: destaggered V-wind component
WA: destaggered vertical velocity
UMET: earth-relative westerly wind component
VMET: earth-relative southerly wind component
POTVORT: potential vorticity
PSFC: surface pressure
SLP: sea-level pressure
Q2: 2-m water vapor mixing ratio
T2: 2-m temperature
TH2: 2-m potential temperature
U10: 10-m U-wind component
V10: 10-m V-wind component
UMET10: 10-m earth-relative westerly wind component
VMET10: 10-m earth-relative southerly wind component
RAINC: accumulated convective surface precipitation (D1 only)
RAINNC: accumulated non-convective surface precipitation
SNOWNC: accumulated surface snow
GRAUPELNC: accumulated surface graupel
SR: fraction of frozen precipitation
MLLCL: mixed-layer lifting condensation level
MLLFC: mixed-layer level of free convection
MLLNB: mixed-layer level of neutral buoyancy
MLLPL: mixed-layer lifted parcel level
MLCAPE: mixed-layer convective available potential energy
MLCIN: mixed-layer convective inhibition
MULCL: most-unstable lifting condensation level
MULFC: most-unstable level of free convection
MULNB: most-unstable level of neutral buoyancy
MULPL: most-unstable lifted parcel level
MUCAPE: most-unstable convective available potential energy
MUCIN: most-unstable convective inhibition

meteorology on Hamsl

methamsl

Same variables as methagl but levels interpolated to heights above mean sea level.

meteorology on pressure

metpres

Same variables as methagl but with HAMSL substituted for PRESSURE and levels interpolated to pressure levels.

staggered meteorology

metst

U: U-wind component staggered in west-east direction
V: V-wind component staggered in south-north direction
W: W-wind component staggered in bottom-top direction
XLAT_U: latitude of staggered U grid
XLONG_U: longitude of staggered U grid
XLAT_V: latitude of staggered V grid
XLONG_V: longitude of staggered V grid
GEOPT_STAG: geopotential on staggered bottom_top grid

boundary layer

pbl

UST: u* from similarity theory
PBLH: planetary boundary layer height
TKE: turbulent kinetic energy
XKMV: vertical eddy viscosity
XKMH: horizontal eddy viscosity
XKHV: vertical eddy diffusivity of heat
XKHH: horizontal eddy diffusivity of heat
TKE_PBL: turbulent kinetic energy from PBL scheme (D1 and D2 only)
EL_PBL: length scale from PBL (D1 and D2 only)

radiation

rad

COSZEN: cosine of solar zenith angle
SWUPT: upward shortwave radiation flux at top of model
SWUPTC: clear-sky upward shortwave radiation flux at top of model
SWDNT: downward shortwave radiation flux at top of model
SWDNTC: clear-sky downward shortwave radiation flux at top of model
SWUPB: upward shortwave radiation flux at surface
SWUPBC: clear-sky upward shortwave radiation flux at surface
SWDNB: downward shortwave radiation flux at surface
SWDNBC: clear-sky downward shortwave radiation flux at surface
LWUPT: upward longwave radiation flux at top of model
LWUPTC: clear-sky upward longwave radiation flux at top of model
LWDNT: downward longwave radiation flux at top of model
LWDNTC: clear-sky downward longwave radiation flux at top of model
LWUPB: upward longwave radiation flux at surface
LWUPBC: clear-sky upward longwave radiation flux at surface
LWDNB: downward longwave radiation flux at surface
LWDNBC: clear-sky downward longwave radiation flux at surface
ALBEDO: albedo
ALBBCK: background albedo
EMISS: surface emissivity

surface

sfc

TSLB: soil temperature
SMOIS: soil moisture
SH2O: soil liquid water
SMCREL: relative soil moisture
SFROFF: surface runoff
UDROFF: underground runoff
GRDFLX: ground heat flux
ACGRDFLX: accumulated ground heat flux
ACSNOM: accumulated melted snow
NOAHRES: residual of Noah surface energy budget
TMN: soil temperature at lower boundary
SNOALB: snow albedo
SNOW: snow water equivalent
SNOWH: snow height
CANWAT: canopy water
LAI: leaf-area index
TSK: skin temperature
HFX: surface sensible heat flux
LH: surface latent heat flux

static

stat

ZNU: eta values on half (mass) levels
ZNW: eta values on full (W) levels
ZS: depths of centers of soil levels
DZS: thickness of soil levels
HGT: terrain height
VAR: orographic variance
VAR_SSO: variance of subgrid-scale orography
FNM: upper weight for vertical stretching
FNP: lower weight for vertical stretching
RDNW: inverse d(eta) values between full (W) levels
RDN: inverse d(eta) values between half (mass) levels
DNW: d(eta) values between full (W) levels
DN: d(eta) values between half (mass) levels
ZETATOP: zeta at model top
P_TOP: pressure at model top
T00: base state temperature
P00: base state pressure
TLP: base state lapse rate
TISO: temperature at which the base temperature turns constant
TLP_STRAT: base state lapse rate (dt/d(ln(P)) in stratosphere
P_STRAT: base state pressure at bottom of stratosphere
LANDMASK: land mask
LAKEMASK: lake mask (lake model not used for LASSO)
IVGTYP: dominant vegetation category
ISLTYP: dominant soil category
LU_INDEX: land-use category
VEGFRA: vegetation fraction
MAPFAC_M: map scale factor on mass grid
MAPFAC_U: map scale factor on U grid
MAPFAC_V: map scale factor on V grid
MAPFAC_MX: map scale factor on mass grid, x direction
MAPFAC_MY: map scale factor on mass grid, y direction
MAPFAC_UX: map scale factor on U grid, x direction
MAPFAC_UY: map scale factor on U grid, y direction
MAPFAC_VX: map scale factor on V grid, x direction
MAPFAC_VY: map scale factor on V grid, y direction
MAX_MSFTX: maximum map scale factor in domain, x direction
MAX_MSFTY: maximum map scale factor in domain, y direction
F: Coriolis sine latitude term
E: Coriolis cosine latitude term

(static continued)

SINALPHA: local sine of map rotation
COSALPHA: local cosine of map rotation
XLAT_U: latitude on U grid
XLONG_U, longitude on U grid
XLAT_V, latitude on V grid
XLONG_V, longitude on V grid

tendencies

tend

W_TOTAL_TEND: Z-wind total tendency
RTHRATLW: uncoupled theta tendency due to longwave radiation
RTHRATLWC: uncoupled theta tendency due to clear-sky longwave radiation
RTHRATSW: uncoupled theta tendency due to shortwave radiation
RTHRATSWC: uncoupled theta tendency due to clear-sky shortwave radiation
H_DIABATIC: latent heating from microphysics
QV_DIABATIC: microphysics water vapor tendency
QC_DIABATIC: microphysics cloud droplet tendency
PCC: condensation/evaporation of droplets
PRE: evaporation of rain
CTR: autoconversion and accretion of cloud water
CTR_S: autoconversion and accretion of cloud ice
DEPSUBR: deposition/sublimation rate
MNUCF: droplet freezing rate
MELR: melting rate of ice species
RIM1: conversion of ice/snow to graupel/hail by riming
RIM2: conversion of liquid to graupel/hail by riming
RIM3: conversion of liquid to ice/snow by riming
RUCUTEN: X-wind tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RVCUTEN: Y-wind tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RTHCUTEN: theta tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RQVCUTEN: water vapor tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RQRCUTEN: raindrop mixing ration tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RQCCUTEN: cloud droplet tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RQSCUTEN: snow mixing ratio tendency due to cumulus parameterization
RQICUTEN: ice crystal tendency due to cumulus parameterization

tracers

trace

PTRACER1: conserved tracer initialized at model start with height above sea level
PTRACER2: conserved tracer initialized at model start with height above ground level
PTRACER3: tracer emitted from surface and with a decay rate
PTRACER4: conservative tracer initialized at 14 UTC to 1 for lowest 1 km above the surface and 0 above
PTRACER4_ON: true/false flag for whether PTRACER4 is switched on

File Naming Convention

Filenames for LASSO-CACTI model data follow a similar convention for both the raw model outputs and the subsets. This is like a typical ARM data file, but LASSO-CACTI requires additional characters to uniquely identify the files from each other. An exception to ARM’s filename standard has been granted for LASSO and we are amending ARM’s standard to include this approach for the model files.

The LASSO-CACTI filename convention is as follows, with the first line identifying the different pieces of information and the second line showing an example:

sssIIII.FFFFFF.YYYYmmddHHEEEENNdN.aaaa.Fn.dl.YYYYmmdd.HHMMSS.ext
corlasso.methamsl.2019012900gefs05d4.base.M1.m0.20190129.153500.nc

Table 21 describes the various pieces of the filename.

Table 21 Information Contained in LASSO-CACTI Filenames.

Category

Description

sss

ARM site identifier, “cor” for CACTI

IIII

Instrument name, “lasso” for LASSO

FFFFFF

File type, i.e., the file type abbreviations shown in Table 20 as well as wrfin, wrfrst, and wrfout for the raw model files

YYYYmmddHH

Case date, i.e., model start time

EEEE

Ensemble member data source (ERA5, EDA, FNL, or GEFS)

NN

Ensemble member number within EEEE (optional, not needed for deterministic inputs)

dN

Domain number with leading “d” for parsing purposes

aaaa

Configuration label to identify model settings and other variations between simulations, typical “base” for default configuration in LASSO-CACTI

Fn

ARM facility designation, always M1 for LASSO-CACTI

dl

Data level, either m0 (raw model data) or m1 (post-processed model data) for LASSO

YYYYmmdd.HHMMSS

Time of data in the file

ext

Filename extension, “nc” for netCDF files and “tar” for compilations of files held within a tar file

The example filename above is for the meteorological subset file with data interpolated to heights above sea level, with the case date of 29-Jan-2019 0 UTC, driven by the GEFS ensemble number 5, using the D4 WRF domain, the model configured in the “base” setup, and the data in the file for the time 29-Jan-2019 15:35:00 UTC.

The configuration label is the one portion of the filename that is somewhat vague. This is a catchall label to identify everything outside of the other information categories. For example, the default LASSO-CACTI model configuration uses the Thompson-Eidhammer microphysics. However, some simulations use the Morrison microphysics instead, and this information would be identified via the configuration label. The typical configuration is labeled as base and non-base configurations are generally labelled for what differs from the base configuration. A list of currently available configurations is shown in Table 14.

Observation and Evaluation Files

~~~Discuss here? Or, in Browser section? What files will be available for download and how?~~~